Tag Archives: Peas

Celebrate Something!

March 17th is a minor big deal to meSo much to choose from, especially this year (2018) the weather looks like it will be beautiful.

Gram'ma's Cup March 17, 2018

Gram’ma (or maybe great grandma’s) tea cup. Mint green with pink for… everything!

Saint Patrick’s Day

selfie, March 17, 2018 Most of America puts on something green, drinks green beer or maybe has a green milkshake. My own children loved this day. So do I. As a child my mother would tell us that she was Swedish, and the Swede’s wear orange, not green. As a child, school children were serious about giving a good pinch to anyone who did not wear something green on March 17th. My mother is kind and had mercy on us. We always wore green despite her objection to the Irish (?).

My Husband is Scottish. The Scotts also wear orange on March 17th. My sons are almost militant about this. My youngest is deeply in love with a very Irish woman whom we all fell in love with. So this year, I’m all about orange and Kelly-green.

The New Moon

Pink March 17, 2018 In Hebrew, the month is Nisan which apparently indicates that creation has come into bud, new life is about to begin. It is also the month of Aviv, which has to do with barley being in full head but green. In America, we take the name the eastern native-American tribes give this moon cycle, calling it by the romantic name, The Pink Moon, which I’ve read has to do flowering trees. Wherever the name comes from, it is all about Spring!

Pea Planting Season Ray and I built a structure for our Peas yesterday. I usually plant peas on the 17th of March (no matter what the weather), but pushed it ahead a day because this year the 17th is Sabbath and the 18th is not a day not a day for dirt in my fingernails. I planted half a row of Cascadia Snap Peas and half a row of Maestro Shelly Peas. Both are semi-dwarf, meaning that they do need something to climb but they only get about 4-feet tall. Even being a pea hater (exception made for fresh snap peas with plenty of ranch), Ray came and made a chick-wire tunnel to discourage birds and really lazy squirrels. I’ll get back to you in 5 to 14 days with baby pictures.

Shabbat Shalom

Luke March 17, 2018 And Happy New Year, New Moon. It may sound busy, but it is still all about rest in the Almighty and His word. This Parsha (reading) is called VAYIKRA (and He called)

Levitus 1:1 — 6:7 with Ex 12:1-20

Ezekiel 45:16 — 46:18 and Hebrews 10:1-18 and 13:10-15.

It is also the first day on the religious calendar. A day of new beginnings. And, as mentioned earlier, the New Moon, so watch for the waxing (growing) crescent moon. When it is full it will be Passover, start getting ready!

March the 17th, Sleep the 18th!

March 7, 2015 (3) Cake My favorite reason for March 17th? It’s the day before my birthday. Thanks to my mom for always making it a special day. I’ll be 61 this year and it still feels special. Ray is the one who makes it a special these days. So do my children. My brother even sent me a text offering to buy me a drink.

My Peas are all planted, so I am free to do whatever I want to do. I am blessed!

Debs at the Toy Box Urban Farm


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Peas on the Porch

My gran’ma wouldn’t shell peas on the porch with me. I tended to eat more then I shelled. Now that I’m 60 I wonder, what was all the fuss about eating raw peas?

June 28, 2015 (7) Peas
Honestly, the smartest idea in vegetables during my life time, has to be snap peas. They are absolutely meant to be eaten raw. Raw peas are like eating green candy.

Peas 1 March 5, 2018 I do like lightly cooked, deep green peas, but only on crisp autumn days with salmon and roast potatoes. All of them cooked with lemon and dill. But autumn peas come from the freezer (no canned peas in this house!) To have frozen peas, someone has to sit and shell peas, eating less then they save.

I married a man who hates cooked peas. He would rather eat the dirt they grow in then eat peas. I really do not understand that kind of rejection. But because of him, I can get away with growing enough peas in a large pot.

Peas 2 March 5, 2018 Just add a tomato cage for support and give them plenty of sunshine and time. Just 8 pea vines will give me plenty of green candy. But just in case I want more, and I always do, I plant more pots of peas.

When the vines are taller I will top dress them with worm castings and add green wood chips on top of the soil. Right now it doesn’t seem like I put in enough dirt, but I need room for the chips.

Peas 4 March 5, 2018 I only grow dwarf and semi dwarf vines in pots. I think I could grow six foot vines in a pot, but the dwarfs are easier to keep upright in a strong wind. You could grow peas in pots directly from seed. They will do what they were created to do, “grow and be fruitful.” I even save seed from potted peas. It is as simple as forgetting to water a pot of ripe peas. More about that later in the season. For now, the job of planting peas in pots is the joy of watching them grow. It is far more interesting that watching paint dry.

Luke 2 March 5, 2018 46/35 F in Everett, Washington today. 11 hours, 17 minutes between sunrise and sunset. It is energizing!

I love the book of Luke! It is fun going over it again, re-reading my old notes, even though I have to pull out a magnifying glass to see what I wrote in such tiny hand writing. Tomorrow morning, Tuesday, March 6th I’ll be on instagram praying through Luke 3. Hope you find your way there. God Bless!

Debs in Everett, Washington…. where peas are not the only thing to be up-potted. Solstice Broccoli has been up-potted to 4-inch pots. Whoo-hoo!

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Day 12; Peas

Sunshine and 35 degrees outside, 85 degrees in the greenhouse!

June 20, 2014 (14) Peas
Peas in the greenhouse! If not for the snow and hungry squirrels, they could be planted outside. I’ve always planted my peas outside on Lincoln’s birthday. I’ve pressed those first seeds into frozen soil and into soft soil on sunny days. This year (2018) there was snow on the ground on pea planting day. Thankful for my greenhouse!

Peas February 22, 2018 I have three pea seed varieties that I started for potted peas this year. Dakota which I’ve been saving seed for. I’ve tried Dakota in the garden and was not happy with it. But it shines when planted in a large pot. Green Arrow was also a stinker in the garden. Before I toss the seed to my chickens I decided to give Green Arrow a try in a large pot. I have friends who do not have gardens but love fresh, raw peas so I plan to bring a pot of peas to each of them. Cascadia Snap Pea is great in the garden, but I still grow a pot of them on the back deck to munch on when we have BBQ. They are lovely!

Peas 2 February 23, 2018 Peas can handle cold nights but with temperatures dropping into the 20’s at night, I’ve been bringing all my starts in to my kitchen at night. I’m starting to get quite a collection of starts. It is part of the joy of spring for us at the Toy Box Urban Farm.  It will be nice when the nights start staying above freezing when candle lanterns are all I need to keep my seedlings cozy all night. Until then I’ll keep transporting trays of seedlings into the house at night.

Mark 11 February 22, 2018 More snow predicted for Everett, Washington. 36/33 degrees F. The candle lanterns will be burning all day in the greenhouse. Soup and bread sound good on a snowy day.

While watching the snow fall it would be lovely if you joined me on Instagram or Facebook for #NTin2018. Mark chapter 12 is on for today, February 23 (Happy Birthday to my Nephew Ted!) Hope to see you on the On-line fellowship later today!

Also scheduled for today, planting fava beans. If you have never tried fava beans (a.k.a. broad beans) can I just say, there is so much more to fava beans then Chianti and liver.

I have posted a video from a February when rain was the weather of the month instead of snow and freezing nights. The job of planting peas in soil blocks stays the same. Pop some corn if you have it (the video is only 10 minutes long) and get ready to get dirty!

Debs… fighting a nasty sinus infection but still getting outside

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Sunday Snow

Just because we expect snow in February, it doesn’t always mean we welcome it.

Snow 2 February 18, 2018
The trouble with putting yourself on bud watch, or bulb watch or with starting seeds is the feeling that spring is coming. I guess snow is a nice change from all of the rain we have experienced in Everett, Washington, but this is not the change in weather that I was hoping for. I am thankful for the slice of spring I experience in the greenhouse!

Seeds February 18, 2018 I want to be that Proverbs 31 warrior, the one who laughs at the snow.

She is not afraid of the snow for her household; for all her household are clothed with scarlet. Proverbs 31:10

The regular Sabbath reading for this week is #19, Contributions. I was just reading one of the New Testament suggested readings, feeling a little bit sorry for myself because of my lust for spring. 2Corinthians 9:1-15 speaks of being ready to give, as might be expected from the Torah Portion title. After all of my fussing about forgetting to save some of my seeds and needing to order seeds that I usually save seed for, I came across these verses.

Now He who supplies seed to the sower and bread for food, will supply and multiply your seed for sowing and increase the harvest of your righteousness; you will be enriched in everything for all liberality, which through us is producing thanksgiving to God 2Corinthians 9:10-11

Why do I worry? The Almighty takes care of me! I get to plant seeds that he provides. I get to watch things grow, I get to harvest and eat the most amazing food imaginable. I get to work outside. And I get to give of what He provides to bless others Hallelujah!

So I will continue with one day at a time planting. Maybe this week I’ll call it celebrating the greenhouse in the snow… maybe not. I will probably light a candle (or three) under a big clay pot to take the chill out of the atmosphere in the greenhouse. Spring is still coming.

The plan for this week, February 18-23

  • Fennel (including how to start seedlings for transplanting: 2/18/18)
  • Red and Green Cabbage (with instructions, 2/19/18)
  • Kale (so simple, you may not need directions, but here they are: 2/20/18)
  • Purple and Green Brussels Sprouts (with instructions, 2/21/18)
  • Dakota Peas (which I did happen to save, link includes my how-to video 2/22/18)
  • Frog Island Nation Fava Beans (February 23, with a dinner to table video)

Now, to find my old hiking candle lantern and a big dry clay pot to keep the frost off of my bay laurel and rosemary… both of which are far too large to sit on my kitchen table. Maybe I’ll be laughing at the snow after all.

Snow February 18, 2018 Winter Storm Warning! In Everett that means more snow and nights so cold that I will either  heat the green house -or- Ray and I will be hauling flats of seedlings from the greenhouse to the kitchen table every night. Suddenly I am glad that I did not use heat to sprout my seeds, they would be too tender!

This Week: Highs in the mid 30’s and lows in the lower 20’s. Do I keep planting? probably. What would you do?

Debs in wool socks.

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Spring again… happy me!

3March 26, 2017 (26)

Tiny Pink and White French Breakfast Radishes

Every year about this time, the daffodils bloom, the birds sing during the day and the frogs party by the light of the moon. We survived another winter. It’s good to be alive.

2february-25-2017-1 I have a couple of garden projects I like to start in January and February, but those are mostly to scratch what starts to itch with the first seed catalog. My Gardening starts to get honest when the peas and first potatoes go into the cold, wet soil.

3March 26, 2017 (21) I planted a lot of pea seeds, Tall Alderman, a French Heirloom sno pea, Sugar Snaps and a row of Green Arrow peas. I could show you pictures of those but right now they look a whole lot like clean dirt, wood chips and a nice structure Ray made for them to climb. These peas (a big pot of Cascade Snap Peas and another of Maestro) I started on Presidents Day. They seem to like it outside.

3March 26, 2017 (27) Potatoes: These were started in February. I’ve planted Vikings (Purple, Gold, Fight Fight) Yellow Bananas, and some kind of yellow that I saved from last year. I still have some Russet Burbanks and another fingerling still to put out. We do not have a lot of room for lots of potatoes, but we do what we can. A man once said that if I haven’t had a fresh from the dirt potato then you really do not know what a potato tastes like. He was right.

There is more to spring then peas and potatoes. I had a walk-about  this morning to see whats happening. Here is a small selection.

3March 26, 2017 (20)

The Herb Garden …chives are looking good

3March 26, 2017 (17)

Comfrey coming up in the Raspberry bed. It won’t be long until I’m pulling up big bundles of this daily for the chickens and all my medicinal needs.

3March 26, 2017 (2)

Two years ago I planted some very expensive flowering broccoli (a kale-brussels sprout hybrid). It comes back, or maybe better, it doesn’t die. Every year it sends up a new stem and makes a new branch of kale flowers. I guess it was worth the price of the seed. My hens sure like it.

3March 26, 2017 (5)

There is still a lot of work to do but we are enjoying every moment.

3March 26, 2017 (18) That’s my Rudy Valentine standing in my new strawberry bed. It was supposed to be an asparagus bed but they didn’t take. So all of the strawberries that I pulled out of the herb bed went upstairs into my new strawberry bed. I think these are called Pacific Reliant. I bought two or three plants last spring and now they are everywhere… well they were everywhere, now they’ve moved to this bed. In front of Rudy is a stand of Fever Few, the tea from the flowers does everything an aspirin does without eating away your stomach. The echinacea (cone flower) is just coming up all burgundy and fresh. If I’m not careful where I step, the scent of peppermint fills the air. It’s nice. Welcome back Spring!

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A Garden Journal for March

Perhaps the most anticipated month of the season, March is when things start getting real. The tomatoes that we all fuss over all year long are started. Actual outdoor gardening begins.

March the 17th, sleep the 18th has long been my personal motto. Not for the reason you may think. On St. Patrick’s day, after putting on a creamy green soup and popping soda bread on a cooling rack, I head outside to plant peas, potatoes and onions. Some years it is with a slicker and golishes (an old word for rubber boots), other years it is in shirt sleeves and tenny runners. Both give me joy under the Worm Moon.

Vivi at Vivie’s Kitchen Garden Adds a tray of celery to the list. That sounds good to me! On it.

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Spring means Peas

On a suburban farm in Everett, Washington.

We have been eating raw peas for a couple of weeks. More are on the way. Our peas do not like hot weather, and we sure have been having unusual heat. The main crop is just coming on.

June 5, 2016 (3)

Cascadia Snap Peas…. about the best snap peas I’ve ever had.

Golden Sweet sno-peas

Golden Sweet sno-peas live up to their name. Though they are small for a flat, Chinese style pea, (traditionally used for stir-fry) they are sweet and golden. The flowers are a pretty lavender and purple that age to a deep blue and magenta. When I first saw them years ago, I thought, “If all these are good for are the pretty flowers, then they will always have a place in my garden.” Then I nibbled my first crisp golden pod. They live up to the “sweet” part of their name. I bought my original seed from Uprising Organics. It is nearly impossible to harvest all the pods, even though they are easy to find with their sunny yellow pods, so saving seed from these heirloom vines is really effortless.

June 5, 2016 (7)

Golden Sweet sno-peas

Purple Pod Shelly Peas

Just for fun, I picked up a package of Purple Pod shelling peas from Ed Hume Seed Company. I have not seen any pods yet, just a load of beautiful flowers. Like Golden Sweet Sno Peas, these are full size vine peas, meaning they need a good support for the six foot-heavy vines.

June 5, 2016 (1)

Purple Pod Shelly (English) Peas

The original: Sugar Snap Peas

These are the peas that turned my pea-hating husband into an enthusiastic muncher of peas. We have tried dozens of different types of snap pea in the 20+ years since growing our first crop of snap peas. With the exception of Cascadia, none of the short vine snap peas come close to being as tender and sweet as a plump Sugar Snap in our seldom humble opinion. The six foot vines require strong support. It is still a little early for sugar snaps, the pods in the picture (June 5th) will plump up before they are ready to harvest.

June 5, 2016 (11)

We have been eating tiny Dakota, and our favorite early pea, Maestro, for a couple of weeks. I only planted a taste of the early peas. Their vines are starting to dry up, ready to pass on to the chickens. Working full time, I only have time to tend to short rows. School will be out June 8th, and if the Almighty is willing, there will be time for me to be a farmer, field-to-table epicure and prepper. Still to come out on the pea frame are  Tall Telephone Peas. An heirloom that will hopefully go into the freezer. (I’m am not a fan of canned peas).

May 23, 2016 Bento

Maestro Peas for a sweet treat in my bento

The pea frame

Early morning at The Toy Box Suburban Farm. Because we are making a transition from Square Foot Gardening to Back to Eden, we seldom need to water. But after a stretch of unusually hot days, I ran the sprinkler for 20 minutes in the morning, just to keep the vines from prematurely drying out. You can make out the pea and bean frame Ray put together (the Tomato tree can also be seen.) Climbing beans are just getting started on the other side of the frame. The legs of the frame are set about 18 inches into the ground. We hope that is enough to survive July storms. The plant in the foreground is parsley that I am saving seed from.

June 5, 2016 (18)

Late Spring at The Toy Box Suburban Farm

June 5, 2016 (15)Blue Sky Sunday. Very surprising after the black smoke that rolled through the valley from a fire that ate a recycling center and two other big buildings on the water front. Thanks to the fire men who put on hot bunker gear to fight those fires !!

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