Tag Archives: Peas

Spring again… happy me!

3March 26, 2017 (26)

Tiny Pink and White French Breakfast Radishes

Every year about this time, the daffodils bloom, the birds sing during the day and the frogs party by the light of the moon. We survived another winter. It’s good to be alive.

2february-25-2017-1 I have a couple of garden projects I like to start in January and February, but those are mostly to scratch what starts to itch with the first seed catalog. My Gardening starts to get honest when the peas and first potatoes go into the cold, wet soil.

3March 26, 2017 (21) I planted a lot of pea seeds, Tall Alderman, a French Heirloom sno pea, Sugar Snaps and a row of Green Arrow peas. I could show you pictures of those but right now they look a whole lot like clean dirt, wood chips and a nice structure Ray made for them to climb. These peas (a big pot of Cascade Snap Peas and another of Maestro) I started on Presidents Day. They seem to like it outside.

3March 26, 2017 (27) Potatoes: These were started in February. I’ve planted Vikings (Purple, Gold, Fight Fight) Yellow Bananas, and some kind of yellow that I saved from last year. I still have some Russet Burbanks and another fingerling still to put out. We do not have a lot of room for lots of potatoes, but we do what we can. A man once said that if I haven’t had a fresh from the dirt potato then you really do not know what a potato tastes like. He was right.

There is more to spring then peas and potatoes. I had a walk-about  this morning to see whats happening. Here is a small selection.

3March 26, 2017 (20)

The Herb Garden …chives are looking good

3March 26, 2017 (17)

Comfrey coming up in the Raspberry bed. It won’t be long until I’m pulling up big bundles of this daily for the chickens and all my medicinal needs.

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Two years ago I planted some very expensive flowering broccoli (a kale-brussels sprout hybrid). It comes back, or maybe better, it doesn’t die. Every year it sends up a new stem and makes a new branch of kale flowers. I guess it was worth the price of the seed. My hens sure like it.

3March 26, 2017 (5)

There is still a lot of work to do but we are enjoying every moment.

3March 26, 2017 (18) That’s my Rudy Valentine standing in my new strawberry bed. It was supposed to be an asparagus bed but they didn’t take. So all of the strawberries that I pulled out of the herb bed went upstairs into my new strawberry bed. I think these are called Pacific Reliant. I bought two or three plants last spring and now they are everywhere… well they were everywhere, now they’ve moved to this bed. In front of Rudy is a stand of Fever Few, the tea from the flowers does everything an aspirin does without eating away your stomach. The echinacea (cone flower) is just coming up all burgundy and fresh. If I’m not careful where I step, the scent of peppermint fills the air. It’s nice. Welcome back Spring!

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Filed under Back to Eden Garden, Chickens, Square Foot Garden, Urban Farm

A Garden Journal for March

2february-25-2017-1
Perhaps the most anticipated month of the season, March is when things start getting real. The tomatoes that we all fuss over all year long are started. Actual outdoor gardening begins.

March the 17th, sleep the 18th has long been my personal motto. Not for the reason you may think. On St. Patrick’s day, after putting on a creamy green soup and popping soda bread on a cooling rack, I head outside to plant peas, potatoes and onions. Some years it is with a slicker and golishes (an old word for rubber boots), other years it is in shirt sleeves and tenny runners. Both give me joy under the Worm Moon.

Vivi at Vivie’s Kitchen Garden Adds a tray of celery to the list. That sounds good to me! On it.

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Spring means Peas

On a suburban farm in Everett, Washington.

We have been eating raw peas for a couple of weeks. More are on the way. Our peas do not like hot weather, and we sure have been having unusual heat. The main crop is just coming on.

June 5, 2016 (3)

Cascadia Snap Peas…. about the best snap peas I’ve ever had.

Golden Sweet sno-peas

Golden Sweet sno-peas live up to their name. Though they are small for a flat, Chinese style pea, (traditionally used for stir-fry) they are sweet and golden. The flowers are a pretty lavender and purple that age to a deep blue and magenta. When I first saw them years ago, I thought, “If all these are good for are the pretty flowers, then they will always have a place in my garden.” Then I nibbled my first crisp golden pod. They live up to the “sweet” part of their name. I bought my original seed from Uprising Organics. It is nearly impossible to harvest all the pods, even though they are easy to find with their sunny yellow pods, so saving seed from these heirloom vines is really effortless.

June 5, 2016 (7)

Golden Sweet sno-peas

Purple Pod Shelly Peas

Just for fun, I picked up a package of Purple Pod shelling peas from Ed Hume Seed Company. I have not seen any pods yet, just a load of beautiful flowers. Like Golden Sweet Sno Peas, these are full size vine peas, meaning they need a good support for the six foot-heavy vines.

June 5, 2016 (1)

Purple Pod Shelly (English) Peas

The original: Sugar Snap Peas

These are the peas that turned my pea-hating husband into an enthusiastic muncher of peas. We have tried dozens of different types of snap pea in the 20+ years since growing our first crop of snap peas. With the exception of Cascadia, none of the short vine snap peas come close to being as tender and sweet as a plump Sugar Snap in our seldom humble opinion. The six foot vines require strong support. It is still a little early for sugar snaps, the pods in the picture (June 5th) will plump up before they are ready to harvest.

June 5, 2016 (11)

We have been eating tiny Dakota, and our favorite early pea, Maestro, for a couple of weeks. I only planted a taste of the early peas. Their vines are starting to dry up, ready to pass on to the chickens. Working full time, I only have time to tend to short rows. School will be out June 8th, and if the Almighty is willing, there will be time for me to be a farmer, field-to-table epicure and prepper. Still to come out on the pea frame are  Tall Telephone Peas. An heirloom that will hopefully go into the freezer. (I’m am not a fan of canned peas).

May 23, 2016 Bento

Maestro Peas for a sweet treat in my bento

The pea frame

Early morning at The Toy Box Suburban Farm. Because we are making a transition from Square Foot Gardening to Back to Eden, we seldom need to water. But after a stretch of unusually hot days, I ran the sprinkler for 20 minutes in the morning, just to keep the vines from prematurely drying out. You can make out the pea and bean frame Ray put together (the Tomato tree can also be seen.) Climbing beans are just getting started on the other side of the frame. The legs of the frame are set about 18 inches into the ground. We hope that is enough to survive July storms. The plant in the foreground is parsley that I am saving seed from.

June 5, 2016 (18)

Late Spring at The Toy Box Suburban Farm

June 5, 2016 (15)Blue Sky Sunday. Very surprising after the black smoke that rolled through the valley from a fire that ate a recycling center and two other big buildings on the water front. Thanks to the fire men who put on hot bunker gear to fight those fires !!

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Filed under Back to Eden Garden, Bento, Fresh from the garden, Square Foot Garden, Urban Farm

Late March at the Toy Box

March 6 2016 (1)
March is stressful. I am anxious to get my garden growing but at school, children are starting to realize that if they want to avoid summer school, they better get cracking! Somehow I have managed to get most of my chores done.

The early peas are in, so are the carrots and greens. Fava beans are showing but there is still so much to do.

March 2, 2016 (3) I love my greenhouse. It lets me go out no matter what the weather is. By doing just a little each day I feel OK about being ready to plant. Those onions are a little disappointing this year. I usually have water from an aquaponics tank to water the greenhouse. Fish tank water is powerful and makes onions fatten up fast! Not so much this year.

March 20, 2016 (5)

Broccoli and Cauliflower hardening off before going into the ground.

March 20, 2016 (2)

Winter-sown artichokes up-potted. I have no idea where I will put them all, but I am confident that I will find a place.

March 20, 2016 (4)

If only I could find a day to plant the sweet peas out.

March 8, 2016 (3)

This little bed is doing well. Early in March I put in mixed greens, peas and lots of volunteer garlic. Every thing is growing well. We have actually been harvesting small salads from the greens.

March 18, 2016 (1)

Sunrise at The Toy Box Suburban Farm. We are still here and trying to share what is going on in Everett, Washington. Sometimes we just keep up with the work and do not have time to write. Never mind, only nine weeks of school left. We will be back soon enough!

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Filed under Back to Eden Garden, Fresh from the garden, In the greenhouse, Square Foot Garden, Urban Farm

Make soil blocks and plant some seeds

I meant to start my February seeds on Valentines Day, but as much as I like to get my hands dirty, I do not like squishing around in soil block mud without gloves. Went shopping, came home, made dinner, kissed my Valentine and BAM it was too dark to work outside. Lucky me, we had Presidents Day off from school too, so out in the rain I went to plant seeds into soil blocks.

Not long enough for popcorn, so grab a licorice or a chocolate and enjoy.

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Filed under In the greenhouse, Urban Farm, Video

Root Division of Tarragon

Spring at The Toy Box Suburban Farm means dividing Tarragon.

So many tarragon lovers take cuttings of mature stems. Honestly I’ve never tried that because early in February, when there isn’t much to do on a NorthWestern urban farm, dividing up a pot of Tarragon is a pleasant way to count down the days until Spring. It is a simple, no fuss way to spend a chilly day in an (almost) warm greenhouse.

The video starts with the onions getting their first hair cut… hang in there for the Tarragon.

February 6, 2016 Weather February Garden To-Do’s

  • Make a tray of “soil-blocks”
  • Start blocks of broccoli, cauliflower and peas
  • Plant Fava Beans
  • Start a mini tray of lettuces
  • Finish (or start) garden plan

In Everett, Washington we are less then 15 minutes shy of the “ten hours of daylight” time. Assuming the weather co-operates, things start growing in ten hours of daylight! Whoot!

Debs…. off to make a Leek Tart with a few of those fat leeks standing proud in the garden and the eggs the chickens are still laying (Thanks Foodie Laura).

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Filed under In the greenhouse, Urban Farm, Video

Morning Devotions: Psalm 5

Surprise! I am so unsuccessful at growing cauliflower, but I keep trying. Found one today! It is small, but this small cauliflower is the biggest cali I've ever grown. Gonna do something with it tomorrow!

Surprise! I am so unsuccessful at growing cauliflower, but I keep trying. Found one today! It is small, but this small cauliflower is the biggest cali I’ve ever grown. Gonna do something with it tomorrow!

Take time to pray.
Direct your eyes
Make God your Refuge

Yesterday, in Junior High Ladies Devotions, we saw Rahab make an amazing confession of faith.

… for the LORD your God, He is God in heaven above and on earth beneath. Joshua 2:11b nasu

Rahab was raised in a pagan culture. She only knew the false gods of Jericho, but when the Almighty parted the Red Sea to allow Israel to cross from Egypt to The Land that He promised to them, and when the giants Sihon and Og were defeated, whose armies were probably why Jericho had such an impressive wall, she knew that the God of Israel was the king of kings, and Lord of lords. The God in heaven above and on earth beneath. We finished our lesson with Rahab living in an apartment in the wall of Jericho. We know that wall is about to come crashing down, yet Rahab and her family will be safe there. How can that be?

October 18th and we are still picking red, vine-ripe tomatoes. They are from our unheated green house, but still, VINE RIPE TOMATOES! I also  picked basil, spinach, parsley and french parsley for sandwiches I made for Sunday afternoon lunch. Sometimes I actually eat something that isn't from a bento box.

October 18th and we are still picking red, vine-ripe tomatoes. They are from our unheated green house, but still, VINE RIPE TOMATOES! I also picked basil, spinach, parsley and french parsley for sandwiches I made for Sunday afternoon lunch. Sometimes I actually eat something that isn’t from a bento box.

Nearly a thousand years later, King David, ruling the land of promise, still acknowledges that the Almighty is LORD of both heaven and earth in Psalm 5. David writes about God who hears our prayer and takes action. God expects us to be different then the world around us. In fact He expects us to live lives that are radically different then those around us. But he is not tyrant, He is the God of lovingkindness. The Hebrew word for lovingkindness is the same as our word for grace. God asks us to live by grace. He asks us to live a righteous life by grace. His lovingkindness makes The Way of grace clear to us. In return, He is our refuge, our hiding place in troubling times. He is our shelter, our shield.

I'm growing these dwarf peas for their greens, but I might just get peas! Peas or not, they are delicious and pretty..... and they do not taste like so many of the cole crops we grow for winter food, another plus!

I’m growing these dwarf peas for their greens, but I might just get peas! Peas or not, they are delicious and pretty….. and they do not taste like so many of the cole crops we grow for winter food, another plus!

You may ask, is an invisible God strong enough here on earth, to protect me from harm? Sure he will bring me to heaven someday if I am good enough, but what can he do for me on earth?

Know first of all that it is not your goodness that will get you to heaven, it is the blood of Jesus that will qualify you for heaven. As for how strong God is on earth, Rahab lived in the wall. By faith in the God of heaven, she and her family were safe in that wall. They would not have been safe anywhere else. Common sense would say that the safe place would have been far away from that wall but faith is being obedient to God, putting your trust in his hands. Sometimes it takes courage to trust in the LORD with your whole heart and to not depend on your own understanding (Proverbs 3:5-6) God kept his word to Rahab. He was a refuge, a shelter and a shield to David. What is he to you? What kind of a risk are you willing to take to test Him?

Ps 118:5-9 nasu
5 From my  distress I called upon the LORD;  The LORD answered me and set me in a large place.
6 The LORD is for me; I will not fear;  What can man do to me?
7 The LORD is for me among those who help me; Therefore I will look with satisfaction on those who hate me.
8 It is better to take refuge in the LORD Than to trust in man.
9 It is better to take refuge in the LORD Than to trust in princes.

Mrs. Hagerty, October 6, 2015

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